Writing is a gratifying profession, especially with all the knowledge it exposes you to. But just because you work as a full-time writer doesn’t mean you’ll always have to sit behind your desk weaving words together. Who says you can’t use your spare time to make some bucks monthly?

Here are great part-time jobs for writers: 

  1. Newspaper delivery 
  2. Cab driving  
  3. Blogging 
  4. Translating 
  5. Pet sitting 
  6. Overnight desk attendance 

This article will focus on other jobs you can do to earn a bit of money on the side. Let’s take a detailed look at this list to see how they make for additional sources of income for part-time and full-time writers. 

1. Newspaper Delivery

The good old days of younger boys and girls with bags slung over their shoulders delivering newspapers are now over. Today, in many communities, newspaper delivery now requires grownups driving cars around town. 

If you own a car or a good bike, you could use a few hours from your day to fling papers. Many freelancers are already using this job to make extra bucks, and it constantly calls for more hands. If you live in a town with more than one paper, you can take turns delivering both and still have enough time to rest and write during the day. 

2. Cab Driving

Cab driving is one job that has existed for several decades, and it doesn’t seem to be slowing down any soon. What’s fascinating about this job is that anybody can do it, provided you can drive and have access to a good car. 

You can take a shift during your off days to drive passengers around town. You can sign up through Uber or Lyft and get out and about during the day when you’re taking a break from writing.

Beyond the monetary benefits of this job, it also offers you the additional opportunity to get new writing ideas from eavesdropping in conversations. Who knows, your next writing assignment could be a review of one of the beautiful landmarks you’ll drive your next passenger to see. 

3. Blogging

Depending on how you choose to look at it, this one is relatively simple for you. Your writing background already paves the way for you to be an excellent blogger. You just need to brush up on your blogging skills. 

If you follow recent trends, you’d probably know that blogging has become a massive business. No doubt, it’s a guaranteed way to earn extra bucks. 

What’s fascinating about blogging is that it allows you to be flexible. You can write on any subject, although it’s generally advisable to stick with topics you are passionate about. You can blog full-time, part-time, or on a freelancing basis. 

What’s important is that you love what you are doing and can do it from anywhere. 

4. Translating

If you’re reasonably fluent in any language, then translating is a job worth considering. Add your fluency in that language with your writing skills, and you’ll be underway to earning more. 

Depending on the spare time you’ll have, you can choose to translate: 

  • Documents 
  • Manuscripts 
  • Books 
  • Research materials 

However, let’s point out that most employers require native fluency for this sort of job. People who speak up to two or more languages are more likely to excel in this field. 

You’ll have fun doing this job, and it could be an excellent opportunity for you to improve your language fluency. 

5. Pet Sitting

Do you love pets? Why not make some extra money caring for them? If you are like me, you can be surrounded by beautiful dogs and lovely cats while you get creative with words. 

Every day you pet sit, you could make up to $100 or more. It may not be a lot of money for you, but you’ll get a lot of freedom to juggle this job with your writing. 

If you need to run errands at any time, you can put them in their crates, so you can get freed up to go about your business. Who knows? These beautiful creatures can also give you new ideas for beautiful stories. 

6. Overnight Desk Attendance

Desk attendance is another flexible job for anybody, as this is the sort of job that offers you lots of free time to pursue other things. Desk attendants typically run shifts, so you can use your time off to research and write outstanding articles. 

Well, that’s not all there is to it – work environments are typically quiet with minimal distractions. Therefore, it’ll be easy to create time to revisit your writing gigs. Of course, you’ll have a computer all to yourself, where you can do your typings when necessary.

Why You Should Take a Second Job In Addition To Writing

Irrespective of the nature of your job, there’s no harm in earning some extra bucks. 

Apart from augmenting your income, these side bucks can go into sorting financial emergencies. While it’s such a beautiful feeling to earn from a talent you’ve always cherished, there’s so much you can do with the extra money that comes from other side jobs. 

Fortunately, there are many simple jobs you can combine with your writing job to earn more. 

Jobs like newspaper delivery, and blogging can be done at night when you don’t have any more official writing to do. After reading this, you may find yourself discovering hidden talents that you can potentially cash out on. 

The other reason you should take a second job in addition to writing is that writing is never a consistent money-maker. If you have another part-time job, you’ll have at least a small consistent income when your writing jobs dry up for a season.

Sources


Oliver Adams

Letter Review was founded by Oliver Adams, who is a PhD candidate in Creative Writing, casual academic, and guest lecturer at the University of New South Wales. Oliver Adams has had short stories published in leading literary journals such as Overland, Southerly, Seizure, and TEXT. He has had novels long listed for major awards such as the KYDUMA, has received government funding to produce plays from Create NSW and screenplays from Screen NSW, and has performed / produced professional work at major theatrical venues such as the Sydney Opera House.