One of the most challenging writing processes is to get external feedback. People either do not know how or are too busy to help you improve your writing, and it can be discouraging if no one is willing to critique your writing. Luckily, there’s a way for writers to get feedback on their work!

Let’s look at a few sites or groups that are made specifically for writing critiquing. These methods will help writers improve writing and build a writing community around them.

Earn Reviews in the Critique Circle

Critique Circle is a writing site that’s been around for a while and has pushed the boundaries of letting writers get their work out there. Writers can post their work and get feedback from others who write in the same genre as them. 

The website is very user-friendly, and writing critiques are generally helpful without being too harsh or discouraging.

Users join the Critique Circle and review other writers’ work to earn “credits.” Credits allow writers to post their work for critique. So, with this site, you must do the work of critiquing fellow writers to have your work looked at.

This community feature gives the Critique Circle an advantage over other writing sites because you aren’t alone: there will always be another person online willing to help you improve your craft if they have time.

This is one of the best sites for having your work critiqued. Critique Circle is perhaps the most popular tool for writers looking for guidance or opinions.

Gain Experience with Writing Critiques on Reddit

One of the best ways to get writing critique is by joining writing groups or forums on the Internet, such as Reddit’s /r/WritingGroup. This subreddit has about 30k members who are all looking for feedback on their work. You can even post links to your stories in this forum and seek advice from over thirty thousand people! 

These Redditors will leave comments with suggestions that you may not have even thought of before. They could provide unique perspective points that improve your story tenfold. 

Of course, there is no guarantee everyone will like what you write (in fact, many users may dislike it), but if anything, these communities should be able to help guide you through writing obstacles. 

Participate in Contests and Receive Writing Critiques

Writing contests may be intimidating for writers who haven’t experienced critique in the past, but they are great opportunities to receive writing critique from:

  • Peers
  • Mentors, and
  • Judges. 

Many writing contests have writing workshops where writers can submit their work for feedback before the final evaluation by a judge or panel of judges. 

Reedsy and Vocal.Media have weekly writing prompts that allow you to get your work out to a community for potential critiques. There is even a chance to win an array of prizes if your work is chosen as a winner. 

Online Writing Conferences Are Great Resources for Critiques

Writing conferences are not only an exciting way to network with people in the industry; they also provide incredible resources for receiving writing advice. 

Whether you’re attending as an attendee or speaker, these events should increase your chances of improving your craft through constructive criticism. 

Desert Nights, Rising Stars is an online writers conference with Arizona State University. Conferences like these offer free sessions that give participants the opportunity to share their writing and valuable feedback on it, so don’t miss out! 

The writing conference is also a great place to seek critique because you can receive it from multiple sources. This benefit comes with the added bonus of comparing feedback and choosing which advice works best for your writing style.

Turn to Facebook for Writing Critiques

There are tons of Facebook groups out there dedicated to giving writers feedback. 

The Writing Gals Critique Group is a safe space for all writers, regardless of writing experience or genre. You must request membership, and approval is required before joining! 

Some other popular Facebook Groups for writing critiques include:

A lot of these groups have 10,000+ members and allow writers to post in the group to receive open feedback on their work. Research each group’s requirements and terms before posting, though, as some don’t allow specific content or promotion of any kind. 

Vocal.Media is a Source for Writing Critiques and Contests

Vocal.Media is a website and social media platform for individuals who want to get writing critiques. Writers can:

Many writers use this platform to hone their craft through:

  • Contests
  • Writing prompts, and 
  • Other tools such as the Vocal.Media critique community.

Vocal.Media requires a membership to enter writing contests but posting for potential critique is free! Vocal’s site has a sleek design and is very user-friendly. There is also a potential to earn money each time a user reads your story.

AllPoetry is a Source for Poets Needing Critiqued

AllPoetry is perfect for poets who need feedback on their work before publication or other forms of distribution. The website also has its own social media that enables users to share writing with friends and family members.

A free membership allows you to join a poem gathering and submit your work for evaluation, while a premium membership is required for hosting your own private writing criticism sessions. 

A $5.95 monthly silver membership enables you to form a group, while a $14.95 monthly gold membership provides statistics.

ABCTales – A Free Site for Writers Seeking Feedback & Advice

ABCTales is a free site where writers can find writing advice and feedback from other users. The emphasis on long, steady writer growth in ABCTales distinguishes it from other sites. 

There is a forum full of writers sharing publishing-related advice and a community to help answer questions and give writers plenty of feedback. 

Conclusion

Writers are often told to avoid a writing critique because it makes them feel bad. But why should they be discouraged from reading other people’s work and giving their opinion about the quality of that work? 

The web has many sites or groups where writers can give feedback on each other’s stories, poems, articles, etc., which will help create a community around the writer and improve their writing skills. 

Sources

https://new.critiquecircle.com/landing

https://piper.asu.edu/conference

https://vocal.media/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/innercirclewritersgroup/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/1476343355941323/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/FreelanceCMW/

https://www.facebook.com/groups/10MinNovelists/

https://allpoetry.com/

https://www.abctales.com/


Oliver Adams

Letter Review was founded by Oliver Adams, who is a PhD candidate in Creative Writing, casual academic, and guest lecturer at the University of New South Wales. Oliver Adams has had short stories published in leading literary journals such as Overland, Southerly, Seizure, and TEXT. He has had novels long listed for major awards such as the KYDUMA, has received government funding to produce plays from Create NSW and screenplays from Screen NSW, and has performed / produced professional work at major theatrical venues such as the Sydney Opera House.